the Little Red Reviewer

Posts Tagged ‘read-along

Welcome to week four of what is becoming the most incredible (and holy shit, like largest) read along ever!  You see, we accidentally set a precedent here, that all future read alongs will attempt to reach. Ladies and gents, take a look, a gander, a peek, at what we have unleashed. It’s shaggy! And there’s more!

This week’s questions/discussion starters were supplied by Ashley, who posts on Mondays at SF Signal, and as she so perfectly put it, this is the section where a whole LOT happens.  You thought that torture scene back at Barsavi’s was when the shit got real? That was nothing.

it’s unavoidable, this is one hell of a spoiler ridden post, so if you have never read The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch, or are participating in the read along but may be a little behind, you will want to skip this post until you have read up through Chapter 13 Orchids and Assassins.

That said, the rest of the everything is after the jump. If you are reading this in an RSS feed, I suggest you scroll really, really fast.

Other read along discussions:

Lynn’s Book Blog
Nashville Book Worm
Dark Cargo
Genkinahito’s Blog
Scruffy Fiction
Numbers Words and Ramblings
Tehthyan Books
Kaitharshayr’s Musings
Paperless Reading
Rose’s Thingamajig
Rememorandum
ReadBooks4Ever
Booky Pony
Beware of the Froggies
Coffee Cookies and Chili Peppers
Books without any pictures
All I Am – A Redhead
A Blog thinger
My Awful Reviews
The Bente Way of Life
Travels Through Iest

newly added conversations!

The Hugo Endurance Project
Felix Pearce
John Ayliff
SF Signal

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I only read books like this because it’s the only book I own!

Liar!!

I only read books like this because I secretly want to be a con-artist posing as a sneak thief!

Liar!!!

I only read books like this because they are scads of fucking fun!

BASTARD!!

Welcome one and all to week 3 of our Lies of Locke Lamora read along. Pranks have been pulled, lessons have been learned, and even more horrible things have happened. The Gentlemen Bastards are up to their eyeballs in it, and some fast thinking and faster running may be the only thing that can save them.  They may be richer and cleverer than their usual sort of opponent, but the Grey King and the Falconer are most certainly not their typical thuggish Camorri opponents.

As we’re beyond the halfway point of the book, there will be spoilers. Sorry, there isn’t much I can do about it at this point.  But, if you haven’t already, you should check out Scott Lynch’s livejournal for some behind the scenes goodies, and My Awful Reviews for some other surprise goodies. There. Does that make up for the spoilers? if not, all i got to say to that is Nice Bird, Asshole.

This week’s discussion starters were supplied by Bryce at My Awful Reviews, and cover Chapter 5 through the end of the interlude called the Half Crown war.

1. This section is where we finally get to sneak a peek at the magic in The Gentleman Bastards books. From what we read, what are your initial impressions of the magic Lynch is using? Is there any way that Locke and Company would be able to get around the Bondsmage’s powers?

2. Not a question, but an area for rampant speculation: If you want to take a stab at who you think the Grey King might be, feel free to do it here.

2.5 (since 2 wasn’t really a question) Anyone see the Nazca thing coming? Anyone? Do you think there are more crazy turns like this in store for the book? Would you like to speculate about them here? (yes, yes you would)

3. When Locke says “Nice bird, arsehole,” I lose it. EVERY TIME. And not just because I have the UK version of the book and the word arsehole is funnier than asshole. Have there been any other places in the books so far where you found yourself laughing out loud, or giggling like a crazy person on the subway?

4. By the end of this reading section, have your opinions changed about how clever the Bastards are? Do you still feel like they’re “cleverer than all the rest?” Or have they been decidedly outplayed by the Grey King and his Bondsmage?

5. I imagine that you’ve probably read ahead, since this was a huge cliffhanger of an ending for the “present” storyline, but I’ll ask this anyway: Where do you see the story going from here, now that the Grey King is thought to be dead?

6. What do you think of the characters Scott Lynch has given us so far? Are they believable? Real? Fleshed out? If not, what are they lacking?

7. Now that you’ve seen how clever Chains is about his “apprenticeships,” why do you think he’s doing all of this? Does he have an endgame in sight? Is there a goal he wants them to achieve, or is it something more emotional like revenge?

my answers are after the jump.

Leave your link in the comments so I can visit you and add you to the link list. 🙂

Check out all the other wonderful discussions:
Travels Through Iest
My Awful Reviews
Nashville Book Worm
Rose’s thingamajig
Lynn’s Book Blog
Rememorandum / Logan K Stewart
Scruffy Fiction
Genkinahito’s Blog
The Hugo Endurance Project
Booky Pony
John Ayliff
Numbers Words and Ramblings
Dark Cargo
Just Book Reading
All I Am – a Redhead
Paperless Reading
Coffee Cookies and Chili Peppers
Kaitharshayr’s Musings
Beware of the Froggies
A Blog Thinger
realbooks4ever
Tethyan Books
The Bente way
SF Signal NEW!!
Books without Any Pictures NEW!!

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Hi Everyone, welcome to the second week of our The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch read along!  we’re starting to get into the meat of the story, and many games are afoot. People are starting to die, mob bosses are taking evasive actions, and even the Right People are running scared.  this section of our read along covers chapter three Imaginary Men through the interlude called The Boy Who Cried for a Corpse, and this week’s questions were provided by the lovely nrlymrtl over at Dark Cargo.  Be sure to be  a friendly blogger this weekend and head over to Dark Cargo and comment on her Lies of Locke Lamora post. Lots of other fun stuff over at DC as well.

Some folks mentioned last week their editions didn’t have a map. here ya go, bigger version available at Lynch’s website. while you’re there, check out his live journal. . .  he’s been posting some nifty behind the scenes goodies as well!

Be warned, there be spoilers ahead.  Those wishing to avoid said spoilers should probably not click the “more” button below, as my answers and some other fun stuff is below the jump.  Leave your link in the comments or e-mail or tweet it to me, and I’ll add you to the link list below.

just discovering this read along and want to get involved? no problem! just comment on this post that you want to be added to the sooper seekrit mailing list, and it shall be done. 😉

on twitter?  use #lynchmob.   but not @lynchmob.  that’s someone else.

here are this week’s discussion questions:

1) Do you think Locke can pull off his scheme of playing a Midnighter who is working with Don Salvara to capture the Thorn of Camorr? I mean, he is now playing two roles in this game – and thank goodness for that costume room the Gentlemen Bastards have!

2) Are you digging the detail the author has put into the alcoholic drinks in this story?

3) Who is this mysterious lady Gentlemen Bastard Sabetha and what does she mean to Locke?

4) Are you as creeped out over the use of Wraithstone to create Gentled animals as I am?

5) I got a kick out of child Locke’s first meeting with Capa Barsavi and his daughter Nazca, which was shortly followed up in the story by Barsavi granting adult Locke permission to court his daughter! Where do you think that will lead? Can you see these two together?

6) Capa Barsavi is freaked out over rumors of The Gray King and, in fact, us readers are privy to a gruesome torture scene. The Gray King is knocking garristas off left and right. What do you think that means?

7) In the Interlude: The Boy Who Cried for a Corpse, we learn that Father Chains owes an alchemist a favor, and that favor is a fresh corpse. He sets the boys to figuring out how to provide one, and they can’t ‘create’ the corpse themselves. How did you like Locke’s solution to this conundrum?

Make sure you visit these other wonderful conversations:
Nashville Bookworm
Rose’s Thingamajig
Dark Cargo
Tethyan Books
Kaitharshayr’s Musings
Paperless Reading
Scruffy Fiction
All I Am: A Redhead
Lynn’s Book Blog
Numbers, Words and Ramblings
Booky Pony
Books Without Any Pictures
Just Book Reading
My Awful Reviews
Coffee Cookies and Chili Peppers
Beware of the Froggies
Lisa Pizza / A Blog thinger
Realbooks4Ever
Genkinahito’s
Felix Pearce
the Hugo Endurance Project
The Bente Way of Life
SF Signal

NEW!!!

Updates to the Theory of Everything

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Hi Everyone!  Welcome to our first weekend discussion of The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. As resident cat herder for this first section, I got to come up with the discussion starters. This discussion covers from the beginning of the book through the Interlude entitled “Locke Stays for Dinner”, as per the reading schedule. We’ve just met our characters, and we’re getting to know the island nation of Camorr – run by  a Duke, but really run by the criminal underground, if you get my drift.  We’re just beginning to get an inkling of what’s going on, and it’s already a wild ride!

participating? awesome!  Leave a link in the comments to your discussion post in your blog so everyone else can find you. In fact, as the weekend progresses and more posts come up, I’ll be adding links to the bottom of this post. So check back again, and see what new discussions have gone up!  while you’re at it, check out Scott Lynch’s live journal, for additional fun tidbits.  Cuz he’s just nice like that.

not participating, but want to join in on the fun? Just say so in the comments, and I’ll ad you to the sooper seekrit list of goodies.

on twitter?  use #lynchmob (until we offend someone, that is).

Here are this week’s discussion starters:

1. If this is your first time reading The Lies of Locke Lamora, what do you think of it so far?  If this is a re-read for you, how does the book stand up to rereading?

2. At last count, I found three time lines:  Locke as as a 20-something adult, Locke meeting Father Chains for the first time, and Locke as a younger child in Shades Hill. How are you doing with the Flashback within a flashback style of introducing characters and the world?

3. Speaking of the world, what do you think of Camorr and Lynch’s world building?

4. Father Chains and the death offering. . .  quite the code of honor for thieves, isn’t it? What kind of person do you think Chains is going to mold Locke into?

5. It’s been a while since I read this, and I’d forgotten how much of the beginning of the book is pure set up, for the characters, the plot, and the world. Generally speaking, do you prefer  set up and world building done this way, or do you prefer to be thrown into the deep end with what’s happening?

6. If you’ve already started attempting to pick the pockets of your family members (or even thought about it!) raise your hand.

my answers after the jump!

check out other discussions here:

Nashville Book Worm
Dark Cargo
Rose’s Thingamajig
Felix Pearce
Books Without any Pictures
Lynn’s Book Blog
Geeky Daddy
Scruffy Fiction
Vilutheril Reviews
Booky Pony
Tethyan Books
Paperless Reading
Beware of the Froggies
John Ayliff
My Awful Reviews
Just Book Reading
Kaitharshayr’s Musings
All I Am – A Redhead
Realbooks4ever
Coffee, Cookies and Chili Peppers
Travels through Iest
Logan K Stewart
Hugo Endurance Project
Lisa Pizza
Dark Cargo Explorer
Genkinahito’s Blog
SF Signal
Musings of a Bibliophile
the Bente way of Life

Updates to the Theory of Everything **NEW! ***

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* * * *

Edited on MARCH 4th to add:

Did we get lucky or what? we scored some author participation! Best. Treat. EVER.

* * * *

Thanks to everyone who has signed up to participate in our The Lies of Locke Lamora (and then Red Seas Under Red Skies) read along, we are so very happy to have you!  Haven’t signed up yet and want? Piece of cake, just comment on this post that you want to sign up, I’ll make the magic happen.

There are a few surprises in  store (especially if you’ve never rad the books!), and my co-hosts and I are very excited to get started.  In the meantime, ummm,  has everyone got a copy of  Scott Lynch’s The Lies of Locke Lamora? If not, now is the time hit up your local bookstore or library, or Amazon or B&N.  A basic paperback should cost you less than ten bucks.

If you’ve never participated in a “read-along”, here’s a crash course:  Your hosts are  Dark Cargo, @ohthatashley at SF Signal, My Awful Reviews, and yours truly.  I’ve chopped the book up into five digestible sections and we’ll read one section each week, see below for details.  Every Thursday, you’ll get a super secret e-mail from me with that week’s discussion starters. Wait till Saturday to publish your blog post of Locke Lamora discussion awesomeness.  We’ll take about five weeks to finish the first book, take a week off, and then take five to six weeks on the second book.  Easy as pie!

Don’t have a blog or have a blog and don’t feel like committing to a post? No problem!  I’ll be linking to as many discussions as possible, so just blog hop around and comment as you please.

Some of us have original printing hardbacks, some of us have imported editions, and some of us (like me) have super cheapo paperbacks. Because there are a lot of versions floating around  the reading schedule is based on chapter headings, not page numbers. It works out to about 120-140 pages per week.

that said, here’s the reading plan:

Week 1–  Read prologue thru end of Interlude called “Locke Stays for Dinner”. Discussion questions go out on March 8, posts go up on Saturday March 10

Week 2 –  Read Chapter three thru end of Interlude called “The Boy who Cried for a Corpse”, Discussion questions go out on March  15 , posts go up on Saturday March 17.

Week 3 – Read Chapter five thru end of Interlude called “The Half Crown War”.  Discussion questions go out on March  22, posts go up on Saturday March 24.

Week 4 – Read Chapter nine thru Interlude called “Orchids and Assassins”.  Discussion questions go out March 29, posts go up on March 31

Week 5 – Read chapter 14 thru end of the book.  Discussion questions go out April 5th, posts go up April 7th.

Make sense?  toss up some questions in teh comments if you got ’em.

What??

You haven’t read Scott Lynch’s The Lies of Locke Lamora??  the stunning debut that came out of nowhere to turn to fantasy inside out?

it’s okay, I have the cure.  😉

You can join us (and by “us”, I mean these folks: Dark Cargo, My Awful Reviews, @ohthatashley blogging at SF Signal, Dark Cargo Explorer and yours truly) on our Lies of Locke Lamora read along this March!  followed by a read along for Red Seas Under Red Skies in April . . .  all leading up to the third book in the Gentleman Bastard series, The Republic of Thieves, due to hit bookstore shelves later this year.

click here for all the delicious details.

You can sign up by replying to this thread, or click on any of the participating bloggers above and signing up on their threads.

This is truly going to be epic.  If you are a fan of dark fantasy, of adventure, of stories with more imagination and twists and turns than you can count, The Lies of Locke Lamora (review) and Red Seas Under Red Skies (review) are more than worth your time and money.

At the end of February I’ll post more details on chapter breaks and such.  I expect we’ll be doing 120-150 pages per week with discussions hitting each weekend.

These are a few of my favorite things!

Ladies and Gentlemen,  this is what you’ve been waiting for. This is the “February surprise”.

This is what all the fuss is about.

This spring, I invite you to join Dark Cargo, My Awful Reviews, @OhthatAshley posting at SF Signal, and Dark Cargo Explorer and Yours Truly on an epic journey through the elderglass towers, the corrupt marketplaces, the shark infested waters beneath the pirate ship fortresses, and the thief prowling alleys and bridges of Camorr. I invite you to join us on what could be the reading experience of your life. I invite you to join us on our read along of Scott Lynch’s debut novel The Lies of Locke Lamora, the unassuming looking fantasy novel that started cults, inspired restraining order style behavior, and quite possibly changed everyone’s ideas of dark fantasy and antiheroes.  Don’t worry, we’ll be reading Red Seas Under Red Skies as well.  Can’t have a summer without pirates, now can we?

If you’ve never read Scott Lynch’s Gentlemen Bastards sequence which starts with The Lies of Locke Lamora and continues in Red Seas Under Red Skies, this is your opportunity.  If you’ve read one or both books before, the timing couldn’t be better for a re-read, as this whole thing is in preparation for the Republic of Thieves, due to hit bookstore shelves later this year. Yes! This year! Really!  Scott Lynch said so!

How to join in, you ask?

It’s easy.   all you have to do is reply to this thread* (or to any of the other participating bloggers) . I’ll add you to my super secret e-mail mailing list, and you’ll get an e-mail with discussion starters for each section of the book. Post your responses to your blog, and poof, the awesomeness has begun!

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some of the books reviewed here were free ARCs supplied by publishers/authors/other groups. Some of the books here I got from the library. the rest I *gasp!* actually paid for. I'll do my best to let you know what's what.