the Little Red Reviewer

Posts Tagged ‘England

It’s been a busy work week, and a slow-going reading week.  Yep, no five for Friday for you last week, I was exhausted. Don’t worry, the stuff I’ve been busy with has been all good stuff that is keeping me out of trouble!

 

I’ve been slowly making my way through All Clear by Connie Willis, and I finished it about an hour ago.

 

some thoughts:

OMFG was the never ending scene to get to St. Paul’s annoying!  If she had just told Binnie and Alf to bugger off, and ditched the doctor and the ambulance, maybe she’d have gotten to the church on time!   Those were seriously THE MOST annoying 50 pages I have ever read.  oh, it was only 5 pages? It felt like 50.  I very nearly DNFd this book because that scene was so annoying!

 

The short scenes with Ernest and Fortitude South. I am embarrassed that it took me a gazillion pages to figure out where everyone’s names were from.  come on, I haven’t read that play since high school!  and now I want to know everything about Fortitude South, because holy shit so brilliant!

 

It also took me FOREVER to figure out that people we meet in 1944 are people I’ve already met.  thanks for Agatha Christie’ing me, Willis!

 

Are Connie Willis and Ann Perry friends, or was that just a coincidence?

 

Connie Willis and Robin Hobb must be friends,  they both subscribe to the philosophy of “imagine the worst possible thing that could happen to your characters, and then do it”.

 

That’s who Colin is??  WHAHHHH?????

 

now that I’ve finished the duology, the only thing I want to do is reread them both, so I can pick up all the hints I missed the first time.  I have a feeling this duology is just like that painting that everyone in the book is always going on about – that you see something different every time you look at it.

 

Also, I suddenly feel really bad about  bitching about that interminable-seeming ambulance / chase scene / split up  / climb the rafters / everyone ends up at the hospital even though they are trying to get to St. Paul’s scene.  Every minute was important, and I was a whiny bitch about it.

 

maybe I should take a break from time travel books?  HAHAHAHA, no.

 

Oxford needs to do a “Connie Willis literary tour”.

 

this book was so fucking hopeful it makes me want to cry.  Everything I’ve read by Willis is so damn hopeful. It’s like she’s saying to me “People are capable of so much good. Here, let me show you”. I kinda need that right now.  Is this what hopepunk is?  Please say that it is.

 

that is all.

 

have a great week everyone.

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the quarryThe Quarry, by Iain Banks

published June 2013

where I got it: received review copy from the publisher

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I’m supposed to be reviewing Hugo stuff, you say?

Don’t you worry, I got plenty of that sweet stuff right around the corner for you, but when an Iain Banks shows up on your doorstep, everything else gets brushed aside. It’s like getting a Lynch, or a Rothfuss, you know?

The Quarry was Iain Banks’ final novel. It’s tough for me to even type that without getting a lump in my throat. He wrote somewhere that had he known this was going to be his last, he would have written a better book, something more epic. Personally, I think he chose a damn good one to go out on. No “M” in the name means this is plain old contemporary fiction. No spaceships, no aliens, no artificial intelligences, no galaxy spanning cultures.  It’s been ages since I read a good old novel. If they were all this good, I’d read ‘em more often.

Eighteen year old Kit lives with his dying father Guy in an old house that’s falling apart. In the final stages of terminal cancer, Guy grudgingly depends on Kit for everything, often lashing out at him in frustration. It’s never explicitly stated, but Kit is definitely on the high functioning end of the Autism spectrum.

The entire story is told in present tense from Kit’s point of view, and it’s his voice that really pulls you in.  He has so much to say, he just doesn’t quite know how to say it, or who to say it to, or why in fact, things like that even need to be said. He doesn’t understand rhetorical questions or why people just can’t say what they are thinking or feeling. Guy obviously loves his son very much, but it’s unfortunate that there are very few places where Kit is accepted for who he is. Had the story been from anyone else’s point of view, he would have been a quiet kid who faded into the background, and the reader would have missed out on an incredible character.

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The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

Published in 1992

Where I got it: purchased used

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In the future, historians don’t just study the past, they visit it.  In 2048 the technology that allows time travel is still rather new, so calculations are double checked and triple checked. At Oxford, Kivrin has been studying for years with Dr. Dunworthy to qualify to travel back to the early 1300s.  Armed with inoculations against the plague and other diseases, a translator, and a recorder embedded in her wrist, Kivrin is as prepared as anyone could be. What could possibly go wrong?

Kivrin refers to her ‘corder as the Domesday Book, in reference to the records of life in the middle ages that were created for William the Conquerer, and she starts recording as soon as she arrives in the past.  But something has already gone wrong. If she can only get to the village in the valley, perhaps someone can help her. Maybe they know the name of the town, or of the village. But she is so cold, and so dizzy all of a sudden. . .

Meanwhile, back in merry old modern (comparatively) times England,  other people aren’t feeling well either.  As a dangerous illness spreads across Oxford, quarantines are put into place and medications start to run low.  Dr. Dunworthy needs to be sure that Kivrin arrived in the right place, and even more important, in the right when.  With a narrative that jumps back and forth between Middle Ages England and 2048, Willis keeps keeps the suspense high.

 

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some of the books reviewed here were free ARCs supplied by publishers/authors/other groups. Some of the books here I got from the library. the rest I *gasp!* actually paid for. I'll do my best to let you know what's what.
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